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When you invest in an early-stage startup, you aren’t really investing in the company as it is.

It may sound strange, but hear me out. You’re not investing because of what that startup has achieved so far – you’re investing because of what you believe it can do in the future. It’s that sense of mystery – that forward-thinking mindset – that makes angel investing so exciting and fun.

Still, when I first started out, I often found myself surprised by which companies in my portfolio ended up being the biggest winners.

Now, after more than a decade investing in startups, I’ve nailed down a super-successful strategy that helps me choose the best deals. At the Angels & Entrepreneurs Summit last week, we talked all about how that strategy works – and how you can implement that same strategy to stack your portfolio with home runs.

In case you missed it, you can catch a rebroadcast of the summit by clicking here. I highly recommend that you catch this comprehensive presentation – it’s loaded with exclusive content you won’t find anywhere else.

In the meantime, let’s talk a little bit about open-mindedness.

When I said that I often found myself surprised by the winners in my portfolio, I didn’t mean that I thought they would fail. After all, I believed in them enough to write a check in the first place.

But we angel investors can’t help but ascribe a sort of mental ranking to each startup in our portfolio. In other words, there are deals we think are likely to hit, and those we feel sure will hit.

And you’d be surprised how often we’re wrong.

Check out the video above to see what I mean.

Until next time,

Neil Patel


Comments

11 responses to “Why You Should Never Underestimate Your Portfolio’s Potential”

  1. I agree with Susan; I get tired of signing up for a new subscription and then after a little more information being told I need to upgrade and pay more money before given recommendations to purchase for my portfolio.

  2. Hoop la the above are right,pay pay pay know info just hype,a scam by the wealthy that think they are above every one an can lie an they got me for my cash and I have nothing.

  3. Im excited to see the choices that we are given to invest in. and I appreciate the training vedios that will guide in those decisions. thank you

  4. I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO INVEST YOU SOUND LIKE SOME ONE I NEED TO TALK WITH I HAVE NEVER INVESTED,BUT DON’T WANT TO GIVE MY MONEY TO SOME ONE OR SMOTHING DON’T KNOW ANY THING ABOUT, BUT I WAN’T TO KNOW. MILTON MOYSALE11@YAHOO.COM. THANKS.

  5. As a lifetime member, I should have access to all your ideas for life. Pls commit that you will NOT ask for any additional payment for deal information or for additional information about past deals. I already paid. I bail out upon receipt of any such solicitation.

  6. Thank you Neil. The amount of information you have provided us with is awesome. I look forward to continuing to learn more.

  7. There are a lot of STARTUP companies that he is mentioned.
    The problem is unlike Blue Chip companies, these companies have NO TRACK RECORD.

    Without knowing which Neil at least BELIEVES is a good deal, then we are
    going INTO THIS BLIND. And that is ultra risky. I could put $100 in
    (10) STARTUPS, but the great majority of these STARTUPS will fail. Much less never make it to the IPO.

    I am NOT looking to get rich, but hopefully earn slightly more, & willimng to wait 2-3 years.

    **We NEED Neil to state clearly which STARTUPS he thinks is a good
    bet.

  8. These are all great comments. I wish Neil and his associates will respond, so potential investors are better informed and guided.

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