Dear Startup Investor,

David Weisburd here – serial entrepreneur, co-head of venture capital at 10X Capital, and the newest member of the Angels & Entrepreneurs advisory board.

It’s great to meet you!

In the coming weeks and months, I’ll be sharing with you some of my favorite angel investing stories, tips, and strategies, accumulated over more than a decade in the biz. I’m so impressed with the community you’ve all built here, and I can’t wait to be part of it.

But before we get into the nitty-gritty, let me tell you a little bit about myself. Ever since my sophomore year in high school, when I chose to work for myself (vs. trading my time for money) I’ve been an active entrepreneur.

Starting as a ticket scalper at the age of 15, I capitalized on the changing ticket market dynamic when I started TicketCelebration.com together with my cousin Ben.

TicketCelebration.com quickly became the largest B2B network at the time – and eventually became the largest supplier of inventory to StubHub (one time even crashing StubHub’s servers, but that’s another story).

By virtue of hard work and a little bit of luck, I grew TicketCelebration.com into a $2MM revenue business and I became a self-made millionaire by the age of 21. This early career break allowed me to pack all my stuff and to move to Silicon Valley with several of my friends in order to start a new tech company called iSocket.

After more than a year of knocking on the doors at VC funds and getting rejected close to 100 times, we went on to raise over $16 million. And it came from some of the industry’s most prominent investors, including Peter Thiel, Tim Draper, Jeff Clavier, David Blumberg, and many others.

iSocket was eventually acquired for an eight-figure sum and I decided, like many of the iSocket board members, that I needed an Ivy League MBA… So I headed to business school at Dartmouth.

But as usual, it didn’t take long for me to catch the entrepreneurial “bug” again.

During my second year of business school, while my classmates recruited for jobs at prestigious banks and consulting firms, I started RoomHunt.com, which revolutionized the roommate and rental experience. As Founder & CEO, I grew RoomHunt into 72 geographic markets, at which point the company was acquired by RentLingo.

Shortly afterwards, with the help of my mentor, Errik Anderson (co-founder of Adimab, Compass Therapeutics, and Alloy Therapeutics), I became a venture capital investor through my investment into Compass Therapeutics, alongside Fidelity, Orbimed, and Google Ventures.

Since 2014, I’ve had the chance to invest into some of the most prolific startups of the last decade, including 23andMe, DraftKings, Headspace, Palantir, and Wish, alongside the “who’s who” of venture capitalists. And by investing capital into nearly 50 venture-backed companies, I learned exactly how to source and access the best opportunities.

Most importantly, I’ve learned the dozen or so things that every private investor must know in order to maximize their successes – and avoid very costly mistakes.

I’m excited to start sharing these secrets with you.

Stay tuned – I’ll be back soon. In fact, later this week I’ll be sharing the No. 1 lesson I’ve learned in my angel investing career.

Very Best,


David


Comments

14 responses to “Meet Your Newest Expert: David Weisburd”

  1. angel investors, I’m having difficulty getting started as I do not have the kind of money to even get me through to the information I need to make an investment. I guess I need to get lucky with a small one that then will give me the money I need to take the advice that I’m being given. Any words of wisdom would make me happy.

  2. David
    Congratulations on your investment success.
    I look forward to reviewing and investing in your suggestions.

    • Yes I am a new investors, really came to the conclusion that I need help and would like help the investment field.I work in the past for a oil@gas company. Now I am home because of covid 19. So the little money I have is very little too none. Please share with me how to invest and when to invest.

  3. Ha too funny.. My ticket career started at age 15 as well with buying and reselling concert tickets at school but in 1975. We didn’t have the likes of StubHub back then but I continued and grew to brick and mortar ticket agencies run by phones and walk ins which eventually closed. Things have changed dramatically over the years and now I quietly and anonymously sell on places like the Stubhubs of the world.. Obviously I’m sidelined now due to Covid and can’t help wonder what the long term will be so am already looking at other things to try. I noticed TicketCelebration is no longer up. What are your thoughts on the secondary ticketing future especially for somewhat small operators like me? Would love to have a Ticket conversation sometime. Peace out. Jimmy .

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